Gamblin Colors: comparing between palettes.


 

Impressionists’ Palette

With this palette of Gamblin Artists Colors, painters can paint most natural light situations. These colors all grey down when mixed with white so they easily make the colors of the natural world.

Cadmium Yellow Lt. – cool (toward green) opaque light yellow

Cadmium Yellow Med. – warm opaque yellow

Cadmium Red Lt. – warm (toward orange) opaque light red

Alizarin Permanent – cool (toward blue) transparent red

Ultramarine Blue – warm (toward red) transparent blue

Cerulean Blue – cool (toward green) semi-transparent blue

Viridian – medium transparent green 

Image

Gamblin Color Palettes

Ivory Black – mixing black with moderate tinting strength

Flake White Replacement – replicates the working properties of Flake (lead) White. DOES NOT CONTAIN LEAD.

 

Old Masters’ Palette

Because the Old Masters’ palette has been obsolete since the middle of the 19th century, Robert Gamblin suggests this palette of color that will give excellent results plus lightfastness.

Transparent Earth Yellow — use in place of Yellow Ochre for glazing

Transparent Earth Orange — use in place of Burnt Sienna for glazing 

Transparent Earth Red — use in place of Venetian Red for glazing

Asphaltum — lightfast match to popular 19th century glazing color

Terre Verte — muted earth green, great for grisaille

Naples Yellow Hue — light earthy yellow with great hiding power

Yellow Ochre — traditional earth yellow

Cerulean Blue — cool, semi-transparent blue, muted in tint

Ultramarine Blue — warm transparent blue

Cobalt Green — cool green with muted tint

Burnt Sienna — natural calcined earth color

Venetian Red — dense with great hiding power, more a brick red

Ivory Black — general mixing black with moderate tinting strength

Flake White Replacement — replicates the working properties of Flake (lead) White DOES NOT CONTAIN LEAD. 

Portraiture:

Naples Yellow Hue — light earthy yellow with great hiding strength

Caucasian Flesh Tone — light pink base for mixing skin tones. Consider mixing with Yellow Ochre, Olive Green, Venetian Red, Van Dyke Brown

Yellow Ochre — natural earthy yellow

Transparent Earth Yellow — use in place of Yellow Ochre for glazing

Transparent Earth Orange — use in place of Burnt Sienna for glazing 

Transparent Earth Red — use in place of Venetian Red for glazing

Terre Verte — muted earth green, great for grisaille

Ultramarine Blue — warm (toward red) transparent blue

Cobalt Green — cool green with neutral tint

Van Dyke Brown — brownish transparent black

Flake White Replacement — replicates the working properties of Flake (lead) White DOES NOT CONTAIN LEAD. 

Sample Old Master palette: Vermeer in the Girl with the Pearl Earring.

Vermeer’s palette was essentially the same as most Dutch painters of the mid seventeenth-century. The only significant difference was his extensive use of  lapis lazuli  instead of cheaper azurite. A typical catalogue of modern commercially prepared oil paints may display scores of pigments. Today’s artist has nothing to do but choose tubes of the color and quantity of paint he desires from the art supplier’s shelve.1 The situation was not so simple in Vermeer’s time. In many cases the painter had to hand grind paint necessary for the day’s work. He possessed very few of the pigments, especially the brighter tones, available today. Throughout his entire career Vermeer, probably employed no more than 15 different pigments in all. In a few paintings such as Woman in Blue Reading a Letter, he may have used no more than five or six.

Pigments used in the Girl with a Pearl Earring  
1.   white lead
2.   yellow ochre
3.   vermilion
4.   red madder
5.   red ochre
6.   brown ochre (raw umber?)
7.   charcoal black
8.   bone black
9.   ultramarine (natural lapis lazuli)

10.  indigo
11.  weld

girl with a pearl earring, Vermeer’s Palette 

3. Basic High Key Palette

With this palette of Gamblin Artists Colors, painters can explore high key situations with bright tints and mixtures. Consider using the Portland Greys to mix tints if you want more natural looking tints using modern colors. The two basic palettes also work very well together so painters can choose one Cadmium Yellow for opacity and one Hansa Yellow for transparency and tinting strength etc.

Hansa Yellow Lt. – cool (toward green) semi-transparent light yellow

Hansa Yellow Med. – warm semi-transparent yellow

Napthol Scarlet – warm (toward orange) semi-transparent Vermillion red

Quinacridone Red – cool (toward blue) transparent red 

Phthalo Blue – warm (toward red) transparent blue

Manganese Blue Hue – cool (toward green) transparent blue

Phthalo Emerald – warm (toward yellow) transparent green

Ivory Black – mixing black with moderate tinting strength

Titanium-Zinc White – best general mixing white

4. Transparent Glaze Palette

The colors in this palette are ideally suited for use in glazes. Due to the strength and intensity of these colors, painters only need to mix a small amount of color with a suitable painting medium to produce a rich and vibrant glaze.

Indian Yellow — warm yellow makes painting look lit by sunlight

Transparent Orange — warm orange for sunrise/sunset

Perylene Red — cool red with dramatic yellow undertone

Quinacridone Red — cool red replacement for Alizarin and makes high key tints 

Quinacridone Magenta — cooler high key red 

Quinacridone Violet — clean, warm violet

Dioxazine Purple — cold purple that can be used for a black

Manganese Blue Hue — cool (toward green) transparent blue

Phthalo Blue — 20th century replacement for Prussian Blue

Phthalo Green — cold, dark green with great transparency and tinting strength

Phthalo Emerald — warmer, more natural looking Phthalo Green 

In addition to Transparent Glaze Palette, these colors provide the abstact painter with a unique set of visual possibilities:

Mono Orange — clean, bright semi-transparent color, masstone of Cadmium Orange

Mars Black — dense, strong mark making black

Black Spinel — only black with neutral masstone and tint, dries matte

Hansa Yellow Deep — golden yellow, semi-transparent 

5. Landscape Palette

This mixture of modern and mineral colors is Robert Gamblin’s favorite palette for landscape painting. Also consider this a basic palette for creating floral still life paintings or other paintings in which making colors of the natural world is an important consideration.

Hansa Yellow Lt.— cool (toward green) semi-transparent light yellow

Cadmium Yellow Med. — warm opaque yellow

Naples Yellow Hue — light earthy yellow with great hiding power

Yellow Ochre — traditional earth yellow

Cadmium Orange — medium opaque orange

Cadmium Red Lt. — warm (toward orange) opaque light red

Alizarin Permanent — cool (toward blue) transparent replacement for fugitive Alizarin

Ultramarine Violet — natural looking transparent violet

Ultramarine Blue — warm (toward red) transparent blue

Cobalt Blue — “true blue” semi-transparent

Manganese Blue Hue — cool (toward green) transparent water blue

Cadmium Green — opaque light green

Sap Green — dark earthy transparent green with yellow undertone 

Viridian — medium transparent green, muted in mixtures

Van Dyke Brown — brownish transparent black

Flake White Replacement — replicates the working properties of Flake (lead) White. DOES NOT CONTAIN LEAD. 

6. Special Landscape Colors for Dry Climates:

Naples Yellow Hue — light earthy yellow with great hiding power

Yellow Ochre — traditional earth yellow

Venetian Red — dense with great hiding power, more a brick red

Indian Red — very dense purplish red with great hiding power

Cobalt Green — color of the American Southwest, very muted tint 

Special Landscape Colors for Watery Climates:

Phthalo Turquoise — high key mixture for tropical waters 

 

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